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Soda Sugar Comparisons

3 Comments and 14 Shares
The key is portion control, which is why I've switched to eating smaller cans of frosting instead of full bottles.
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npiasecki
117 days ago
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Cadbury Creme Egg? African or European? *dies*
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Screwtape
118 days ago
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It's great to know how much sugar is in a 20oz bottle of soda, now I just need to figure out how many 20oz bottles of soda are in, say, a litre.
CaffieneKitty
118 days ago
Google says it's 0.591471 litres. *metric fistbump*
lukeburrage
117 days ago
I've often wondered why there isn't a XKCD METRIC feed, with all the jokes being in metric. You know, for the rest of the world.
2bithacker
117 days ago
For that matter, are we talking American or UK Cadbury Creme Eggs? The US ones (produced by Hershey) have 20g of sugar, the UK ones have 26g.
thebassman
117 days ago
For the rest of the world? The US is pretty much the ONLY country NOT on the metric system! LOL
sfrazer
116 days ago
The comic references this xkcd which pegs a cadbury egg at 20g of sugar: https://xkcd.com/1035/
alt_text_bot
118 days ago
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The key is portion control, which is why I've switched to eating smaller cans of frosting instead of full bottles.
sjk
111 days ago
Same here. Instead of drinking an entire 20 oz bottle of cake frosting, I can drink several mini bottle of cake frosting per week. I don't always feel in the mood for having an entire week's ration of cake frosting in one sitting. Then again, a soda a day for six month vs 4 gallons of Skittles in one sitting? Challenge accepted!

Consumer Reports Now Recommends MacBook Pros

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Consumer Reports:

New Apple software fixes a battery issue found in CR tests. The software, now in beta, will be part of a broad update soon.

This makes it sound like CR found a problem with the batteries. They didn’t. They found a bug in a Safari developer mode. It’s a real bug, but it’s clear now that it didn’t justify the initial sensational “Wow, first ever Apple laptop not recommended by Consumer Reports!” report. There’s no way they would’ve published that rushed initial report for a laptop from any brand other than Apple. Clickbait, pure and simple.

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npiasecki
136 days ago
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These are people who also test clothes dryers. If their test cycle discovered that the clothes dryer sometimes took 2 hours to complete a permanent press cycle and sometimes took 20 minutes, they would not recommend it because as a consumers' union it is not actually not in their interest to care why the clothes dryer is broken, *or to actually be experts in clothes drying technology*, just to report that consumers would be better off with a more predictable clothes dryer based on their good faith tests of usage. They found a problem, they asserted their position, the problem was fixed. It seems like they just did what they do....
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dannberg
136 days ago
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As a former laptop reviewer, I completely agree with this.
New York City

Git

19 Comments and 38 Shares
If that doesn't fix it, git.txt contains the phone number of a friend of mine who understands git. Just wait through a few minutes of 'It's really pretty simple, just think of branches as...' and eventually you'll learn the commands that will fix everything.
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npiasecki
577 days ago
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For us crusty old geezers still clinging to Subversion, this translates to "something didn't work, so 'svn update' and try again, and if that doesn't work, save it somewhere else and download a fresh copy" ... it's like the cirrrrrrcle ... the circle of source control
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jhudson
512 days ago
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yup..
Olympia, WA
jsonstein
572 days ago
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how it really works
43.128462,-77.614463
rhelewka
574 days ago
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Xkcd on git and nails it:
ÜT: 43.642301,-79.378671
JayM
575 days ago
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:)
Atlanta, GA
Brstrk
575 days ago
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Git is really easy, once everything clicks. I'm waiting for it anytime now.
llucax
577 days ago
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xkcd did it again...
Berlin
jshap999
577 days ago
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You just need to appease the evil git elves.
ktgeek
577 days ago
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I have lived this conversation multiple times.
Bartlett, IL
mrobold
577 days ago
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Truth.
Orange County, California
jepler
577 days ago
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how did you get this number? stop calling me
Earth, Sol system, Western spiral arm
jimwise
577 days ago
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heh
kafka
577 days ago
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True.
Austin, TX
brianhoch
577 days ago
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I'm not alone!
Spokane, WA
mburch42
577 days ago
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My life.
GeekyMonkey
578 days ago
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It's sad, because it's true.

Alt: If that doesn't fix it, git.txt contains the phone number of a friend of mine who understands git. Just wait through a few minutes of 'It's really pretty simple, just think of branches as...' and eventually you'll learn the commands that will fix everything.
Ennis, Ireland
marcrichter
578 days ago
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Touché!
tbd
alt_text_bot
578 days ago
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If that doesn't fix it, git.txt contains the phone number of a friend of mine who understands git. Just wait through a few minutes of 'It's really pretty simple, just think of branches as...' and eventually you'll learn the commands that will fix everything.

Yahoo Finance: ‘Apple Pay Sides With Credit Card Industry Over Consumer Interests’

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Aaron Pressman, writing for Yahoo Finance:

Apple has regularly delighted its customers with cool products on its way to becoming the most valuable company in the United States. But it hasn’t always stood up for its customers’ best economic interests.

Take the case of Apple Pay. Apple partnered with the three major credit card networks, Visa, Mastercard and American Express and the big bank card issuers such as JP Morgan Chase. That is likely a smart move from a business perspective, because so many Apple customers are frequent credit card users and prior mobile payment services have had trouble gaining much traction.

But the partnership decision also meant Apple was taking sides in a long running war between the credit card industry on one side and retailers and consumer advocates on the other.

Retailers typically pay 2% or more on every credit card purchase, costs that cut into their margins and raise prices for all shoppers.

First, the headline. I think it’s clear that Apple Pay is siding with the credit companies and banks — but they’re not pitted against consumers, they’re pitted against retailers. It’s retailers who want to reduce the use of credit cards (and the resulting fees). Not consumers. Any consumer who doesn’t want to use a credit card can simply not use a credit card. (They can still use Apple Pay with debit cards.) Apple Pay is only allowing us to more easily and securely use the credit/debit cards we already have. For consumers, nothing is worse post-Apple Pay (transaction fees are not higher — the banks pay Apple’s 0.15 percent cut), and much is better (security, privacy, and convenience).

I understand the argument that the 2-3 percent processing fees that retailers pay for credit cards are ultimately passed on to consumers in the form of higher prices, but for consumers that can be offset by cash back and reward programs from their card providers.

I don’t understand how this article amounts to anything more than “Apple should have used magic” hand-waving. What could Apple have done differently that would have actually worked, without involving credit card processors? Remember, Apple Pay doesn’t require retailers to install Apple Pay-specific POS terminal hardware. It famously works with the standard NFC hardware that’s been out for years. Building atop the existing credit card infrastructure is fundamental to people’s willingness to try Apple Pay and to retailers’ ability to accept it. Pressman is implicitly arguing that Apple should have somehow reinvented the entire retail electronic payments industry, without the help of the banks or credit card companies, and presumably with the cooperation of retailers. But we see with CurrentC/MCX the sort of things the retailers would have demanded of Apple in such a hypothetical systems.

Update: Another point. Who is to say that Apple Pay won’t add additional non-credit-card payment options going forward? This is just the start. But the start needs to be something that gets the whole thing off the ground.

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npiasecki
943 days ago
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Working in e-commerce for some time, I can see this Apple Pay/CurrentC debate from both sides. Stay with me.

The credit card system is insecure, and it is expensive. Merchants are tired of getting blamed for breaches when the only reason the PCI DSS came into existence was that an ever-connected world revealed the network's fundamental security problem, namely that there is no security. If you know the number, you can charge it. The banks issuing the cards needed to do something to fix this or face government regulation in the 2000s when retailers were getting hacked left and right the first time around. The card networks "fixed" the system by asking every merchant on the planet to keep a number embossed in plastic a secret for all time, and they issued a set of guidelines (which has since ballooned to hundreds of requirements) for every merchant to follow. This was all they could do because the card networks like Visa are not all that advanced, at the end of the day they are shuffling balances and account numbers back and forth. They are the minimum of information exchange needed between banks to keep the charade going.

Think about it. Isn't it absurd that a merchant who is paying 2-3% just to accept your plastic is also the one who is blamed when something goes wrong? Better yet, if it's card-not-present, it's the merchant who is the one paying for your zero liability, which is why your favorite e-commerce site flips their shit when your billing address is wrong. The merchants didn't build the network, so they can't fix the network. All they can do is either (A) bend over, which they're sick of or (B) try to create their own network and hope that ends up doing something -- either by succeeding, or at least getting the banks to step their game up. Hence CurrentC. Some of them made this decision over a year before Apple Pay, and now their hands are tied.

The only people who can really fix the credit card network are the people who created it and issue the cards used in it. Those are the banks and their orchestrating interbank entities like Visa and MasterCard. Since they haven't really been footing the bill for card-not-present fraud and have been blaming merchants for the breaches, there's not much incentive for them to fix the broken system that they created. AVS has always worked poorly, heaven forbid you live in an apartment. CVV2 is a joke. These are the tools they give us, and it doesn't matter, because the merchants are the bad guys in the court of public opinion.

I think this will go down as one of Apple's master plays. They looked at Visa, said "look at these idiots," and got Visa to make changes to their system so that Apple could create a new secure payment platform that just happened to leverage Visa for acceptance and market share, positioning it as a win-win. Hook, line, and sinker: a few years from now, Apple offers an ACH-based balance option, and it's game over. They will have successfully created their own secure payment platform with a physical world acceptance rate that PayPal can only dream of, and the card networks will wonder when exactly they started being replaced.
gazuga
943 days ago
Great backgrounder, npiasecki. Thanks for taking the time to write it. As we were discussing a few posts down, the thing to really keep an eye on is how Apply Pay makes the credit card a swappable element of the payment stack. In theory.
Spuzzy
943 days ago
Wow, thanks for this insight.
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UCJT
942 days ago
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Commercial banker here. Cash handling has a cost to the merchant. And with rates at 0%, there is no earnings credit to offset this cash handling charge. It's a hard charge to the client. Article detailing is dated but conceptually accurate.

http://articles.latimes.com/2011/nov/18/business/la-fi-lazarus-20111118

In addition, the effects of the Bank Secrecy Act combined with the Patriot Act, are getting to where banks would rather not deal with a lot of cash, as any lapse in providing the Feds with appropriate reporting regarding big cash deposits are extremely punitive.

The push to plastic - or more importantly, trackable purchasing habits - comes from all sides.
US: 26.585346,-81.741754
samfarmer
943 days ago
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Retailers have a cost of processing money that consumers use to pay for items with.

Cash received in a store needs to get to a bank. I don't know what that cost is but its not free.
Washington, DC
anthonylatta
943 days ago
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Retail e-payment are dominated by two types: swipe and EVM (chip) cards. That's it. The only exception that's caught on in any scale is mobile money, eg, M-Pesa in Kenya, but that's the only MM system that's truly at scale, though Philippines, Ghana, and Tanzania could follow. NFC is the only technology in developed countries that has a wide enough base to scale. Apple's entry to this market could actually create a new e-payment ecosystem in developed countries. It's pretty cool for payment systems geeks.
Washington, DC
kenfair
943 days ago
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Cash is still legal tender, or at least it was last time I checked.
Houston, Texas
steingart
943 days ago
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grubes grubes grubes:

"I understand the argument that the 2-3 percent processing fees that retailers pay for credit cards are ultimately passed on to consumers in the form of higher prices, but for consumers that can be offset by cash back and reward programs from their card providers."

what a shilly statement in an otherwise well reasoned piece.
Princeton, NJ
satadru
943 days ago
But it is true, no? Consumers with a good CC do get a kickback from the issuing bank. By siding with banks vs retailers, they assume few of the fraud-related downside risks, passing that along to the banks. I would be shocked if Apple doesn't ask for a bigger cut than .15% in several years.
gazuga
943 days ago
Interested in the empirics of the kickbacks claim as well, but I'm making a note to start all my comments under Daring Fireball posts with "grubes grubes grubes".
steingart
942 days ago
kickbacks are the OG loc-kin. If cash is king, not spending it iin the first place is godliness

Target CEO Steps Down Five Months After Massive Security Breach

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Target

Target

Target

Target announced on Monday that Gregg Steinhafel, the retailer’s CEO, president and chairman Gregg Steinhafelhas resigned, effective immediately, the retailer announced on Monday, just chairman, was resigning effective immediately. The move comes five months after Target suffered one of the worst security breaches in

U.S. history.The breach resulted

the nation’s history, resulting in the theft of payment or personal data from between 40 million and 110 million customers. “The last several months have tested Target in unprecedented ways,” Steinhafel wrote in a letter to the company’s board of directors. “From the beginning, I have been committed to ensuring Target emerges from the data breach a better company … With company…With several key milestones behind us, now is the right time for new leadership at Target.”

Steinhafel’s resignation comes two months after the company’s chief information officer Beth Jacob also resigned in the wake of the breach. Target CFO John Mulligan will serve as interim president and CEO until the board appoints a new CEO.

The retailer first divulged on Dec. 18 that it had been the target of a several-weeks long hack that saw thieves making make off with the credit card data of up to 40 million of its customers. But the situation worsened things got worse a few weeks later when the company acknowledged that an additional 70 million shopper accounts had personal contact information pilfered.

In response to the breach, Target has said that it has accelerated the rollout in stores of checkout equipment that can accept chip-and-pin payment cards, which are believed to be more secure than traditional magnetic-stripe cards. The company also said that its branded Redcards will move over to chip-and-pin technology later this year.

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npiasecki
1120 days ago
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I wonder how many folks at banks resigned over this, considering they're the ones who invented the credit card network in the first place and encourage businesses and consumers to use it. Why do we continue to blame the merchants when the merchants did not design the system?
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JayM
1120 days ago
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Meh. Still the first (actually second, as folks seem to have forgotten about TJ Maxx) of many breaches as the tech talent in most retail is a second fiddle to marketing/merchandising departments. Target (and TJ Maxx) still has my business, heck, more my business since perhaps they've beefed things up further than others who believe "that'll never happen to us!"
Atlanta, GA
alang
1120 days ago
Also, let's be clear: as much as chip and PIN will help protect against unauthorized transactions, it's not going to prevent this kind of data theft.

Michael Mace: ‘Has Microsoft Gone Nuts?’

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Michael Mace, on the rumor that Microsoft might license Windows Phone to handset makers free of charge:

Nice idea, Microsoft, but you’re closing the barn door not only after the horses left, but after the barn burned down.

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npiasecki
1258 days ago
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http://hal2020.com/2013/12/12/tanstaafl-making-windows-phone-and-windows-rt-free/
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aaronwe
1258 days ago
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"But that’s not the roadmap we’re hearing from the Microsoft OS team. Instead, they’re talking about creating a single Windows code base that runs across all types of devices, something that’s technically appealing if you’re a Microsoft engineer but thoroughly uninteresting to customers."

Not when you consider that Microsoft's customers have traditionally been *developers* as much as end users. Microsoft has always been good at building and courting developers, and if Microsoft makes tools that let people develop for Xbox, Windows, and WinPhone simultaneously, WinPhone can finally get a decent app store, which is currently its achilles' heel.

(That's not to say they'll succeed at it, but it makes sense from a strategic perspective.)
Denver
aaronwe
1258 days ago
(And if you can't understand why Windows users would want to put Metro apps in a window, you've never used a Metro app on a large monitor. Utterly pointless.)
GuuZ
1259 days ago
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Lees dit artikel MS!
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